SpaceLab at the RGS-IBG Annual International Conference in London 2016

In the period August 30th to September 2nd, SpaceLab visited the RGS-IBG Annual International Conference in London, at the Royal Geographical Society. We were 6 people travelling from Bergen to London, enjoying several days of research inspiration and academic input.

Håvard Haarstad gave a presentation at the conference on Friday September 2nd. He presented the paper Urban nexus governance and pathways to transformation: Finding geography’s place. It was presented at the session Governance Innovations for the Urban Nexus with Harriet Bulkeley (Durham University) as discussant. Chiara Farné Fratini (Aalborg University) and Ralitsa Hiteva (University of Sussex) were the convenors of the session.

We visited a lot of different sessions and presentations on a wide range of topics. Decisions on which ones to attend were at times quite hard. We also met up with our friends and research colleagues from Manchester, Stefan Bouzarovski and his team at CURE, Centre for Urban Resilience and Energy, with whom we had dinner one evening.

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Håvard talking about urban nexus governance

The theme of this year’s conference was “nexus thinking”, an approach that has attracted a surge of interest in the last five years among academics, policy-makers and third sector organizations. The aim of nexus thinking is to address the interdependencies, tensions and trade-offs between different environmental and social domains – an approach to which geographers might feel an inherent attraction. Rather than seeing energy, food and water resources as separate systems, for example, nexus thinking focuses on their interconnections, favouring an integrated approach that moves beyond national, sectoral, policy and disciplinary silos to identify more efficient, equitable and sustainable use of scarce resources. (Source: RGS.org)

 

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The Royal Geographical Society is located on Exhibition Road in Kensington, London.

 

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RGS was founded in 1830 as an institution to promote the advancement of geographical science.